Saturday, October 20, 2012

Psophocarpus tetragonolobus

  You know, I've written about these. Mused on the name for hours of personal entertainment. It means 4-sided noisy fruit. Dreamed about all the things I'd do with them if I went to Thailand. But until recently I had never set eyes on one. Until they show up in the farmers market. The farmer told me his dad brought the seeds and has been trying to grow them for years and finally they bore enough to sell. Some were stir fried the others are being pickled. Where else could this happen but in Stockfish CA?
P.S. They are beans.

5 comments:

Laura@Silkroad gourmet said...

Lovely find in the continental US! I remember these from the time spent in the rural outback of the Thai peninsula.

How did you prepare them? There are lots of good recipes - from India to its native New Guinea and most places in between. One of my favorites is a Thai recipe with with coconut, chili, tamarind and peanuts - yum!

Ken Albala said...

A simple stir fry, but also pickled in brine and another jar in vinegar. They're perfectly lovely. And this week there were two different people with them at the market. And never before in the past 20 years!

Anonymous said...

Wing Beans!
They were used in a competition dish that was made during an Ozzie tv cooking competition, My Kitchen Rules (Beef fillet with green papaya salad with wing beans)
http://tvnz.co.nz/my-kitchen-rules-season-3-recipes/4963164
That specific recipe isn't listed, but at least this gives you another name to search with...

Sherry M said...

I picked a nice little bag of these and stir fried some (they were delightful!) and then tried to ferment in brine (one vessel whole beans, on cut in pieces) .....they were a fail....for some reason. I think maybe because in one jar, I included some blossoms (which you MUST try....they taste beautiful) How did your fermented ones come out?

Kitchen Butterfly said...

It reminds me of a similar fruit/vegetable called Tetrapleura tetraptera..which is sold dried in Nigeria, with the pulp transformed into a spice for making pepper soup, the Nigerian equivalent of Chicken soup.